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Q&A with Carole Mallette, Coalition Avenir Québec

Carole Mallette

Carole Mallette is a well-known businesswoman in the riding of Huntingdon. CEO of Usinages Mallette Inc. for more than a decade, this mother of two lives in the riding since more than 15 years. In addition to her studies in engineering, she has an MBA from Université Paris-Dauphine and École des sciences de la gestion of UQAM. She is involved with various organizations, like Femmessor, particularly to support entrepreneurship. A rigorous manager, she joined the CAQ’s team to contribute to the development of her region and improve the quality of life of the citizens of Huntingdon.

 

 

What would you do to improve or guarantee the availability of proximity healthcare services for rural communities?

Our priority is front-line access. We want every Quebecer who desires it to have access to a healthcare professional in a family medicine group (GMF) within a reasonable timeframe. It was obvious during the pandemic: the health network is still too centralized. We are going to decentralize it to the benefit of our regions to better meet local needs. The private sector can play a greater role. We are going to give it an intelligent and reasonable place, without taking anything away from the public network and free services. We will accelerate our major shift towards home care. We want to respond to the desire of seniors to age at home. With our Plan Santé, we will involve all health professionals, not just doctors. It’s a new approach that will be a win-win for everyone, especially patients.

 

How would you help farmers and farming communities contribute to the fight against climate change?

First, we have a costed and funded plan to fight climate change ($7.6 billions over five years). We are going to electrify our economy, including the agricultural sector, to make Quebec a world leader in the green economy. We will add $50 millions to the Plan d’agriculture durable to encourage 1,225 additional businesses to adopt good agri-environmental practices. This money will also be used to reward agricultural producers whose practices are already exemplary. Next, we want to develop our food autonomy by helping the agricultural sector to modernize itself. For example, we have launched the Stratégie de croissance des serres. We also launched the Stratégie nationale d’aliments québécois, which increases the share of local food purchased by our public institutions. The Quebec state is leading by example and our producers benefit from this. In agriculture, we therefore focus on local purchasing and local production to fight against climate change.

 

What would you do to ensure the constitutional rights of ethnic and linguistic minority populations?

French is the common language of the Quebec nation, and we must do more to protect it. With Bill 96, we have a balanced approach. We let anglophones study in their language, but we make sure they have a certain level of French. We also allow municipalities that wish to do so to maintain their bilingual status. Quebec has opted for state secularism. Bill 21 is moderate and reasonable. Only state employees in positions of authority – when in office – are affected. For the first time in the history of Quebec, we have a minister responsible for the fight against racism. Our action group on racism presented 25 concrete measures. We will realize them all. Finally, we work to develop nation-to-nation projects with First Nations, in total respect of their autonomy and their culture.

 

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